Meat and Fish

Meat and Fish

Definition

Popular varieties of sandwich meat include ham, pork, salami and other sausages, and beef, such as steak, roast beef, corned beef, pepperoni, and pastrami. Meat can also be molded or pressed (common for products that include offal, such as haggis and scrapple) and canned. Meat is an excellent source of protein, which is essential for any healthy diet. It helps build and repair muscle. Moreover, it maintains healthy hair, bones, skin, and blood. Due to its High Biological Value (HBV), the protein obtained from meat is easily digested and thus absorbed quickly and effectively by the body. Meat is a good source of protein, vitamins, and minerals in your diet. Making healthier choices can help you eat meat as part of a healthy and balanced diet. But some meats are high in saturated fat, which can raise blood cholesterol levels.

The Facts About the Importance of Meat in Nutrition

Meat products belong to one of the six major food groups. Poultry, pork, red meat, game, and fish all provide the body with essential nutrients, minerals, and vitamins in order for it to remain healthy. Recently; however, there has been public controversy concerning just how healthy eating meat on a daily basis really is, especially red meat. It has argued the consumption of red meat directly links to heart disease and even cancer. Meanwhile, fears have grown about the amount of fat in all meats, particularly saturated fat.

The Facts

Minerals

Meat has very high mineral content including body essentials like magnesium, zinc, and ironMagnesium is important for bone strength as it improves vitamin D synthesis and helps decrease net acid production. It has been thought that the consumption of magnesium through diet could assist in preventing osteoporosis.  Zinc is vital for the body’s immune system and it is essential for muscle growth and repair. Most importantly, iron helps to maintain energy levels as well as maximize oxygen transport throughout the body. If there is not enough iron being consumed people run the risk of developing anemia and fatigue. Red meat and turkey are particularly iron-rich.

Protein

Meat is an excellent source of protein, which is essential for any healthy diet. It helps build and repair muscles. It also maintains healthy hair, bones, skin, and blood. Due to its High Biological Value (HBV), the protein obtained from meat is easily digested and thus absorbed quickly and effectively by the body. Red meat, chicken, and turkey are extremely high in protein.

 Vitamins

Vitamins are vital in maintaining a healthy body. Meat is a particularly good source of vitamin E, and B vitamins including B2, B6, and B12. Vitamin E has very strong antioxidant properties and helps reduce damage caused by oxygen to cells; it allows faster muscle repair and recovery. B vitamins all work together to help convert food into energy; they also have individual uses. B2 is essential to produce red blood cells, which then transport the oxygen around the body. B6 is vital for protein synthesis and B12 is imperative for good nerve functions.

 Other Benefits

Minerals, protein and vitamins aside, meats especially fish all provide the body with essential unsaturated fats like Omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 can actually help reduce cholesterol levels, blood pressure, and the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases.

Geo Commerce has a long and useful experience in exporting live animals, and meat-related products. Choosing the right animals, preparing them, and exporting them is one of our specialties. The Caucasus region is one of the best areas for live animal breeding because of the existence of plenty of meadows and water.

We can export live animals from the Caucasus region to all other countries. We also have the ability to make sure that the slaughter is Halal for Islamic countries that are already our customers. You can order any live animals or any kind of meat to “Geo commerce”. The best prices and quality in this area will be guaranteed by the “Geo Commerce” Company. We specialize in cattle, swine, sheep, goats, as well as in the commercialization of elaborated products.

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Technology

Meat technology focuses on value-adding to fresh meat, and it has a fully equipped small scale meat processing plant to manufacture fresh and cooked processed meat products including emulsions, smoked and cured products. Meat Technology was involved in research leading to the latest legislation on the inclusion of brine in frozen chicken.  Our current focus is on the utilization of the fifth quarter (intestines, organs, blood) in processed products and the development of shelf-stable meat products at environmental temperatures. Scientists and technologic men have been involved in the FoodBev SETA, unit standard writing, skills programmers and training since ~1998, and have recently been involved in the revision of their first two meat-related NQF3 qualifications and unit standards. They host Introductory (mainly fresh meat processing and sausages) and Advanced Meat Processing (mainly emulsions, curing, smoking) courses.

Meat and Fish

Specification

There are many different types of meat, and all have been part of the human diet for millennia. Generally speaking, meat is good for you and provides a huge range of essential nutrients. This article reviews the nutritional profile, health benefits and concerns of eight common varieties of meat. Meat is an excellent source of protein, which is essential for any healthy diet. It helps build and repair muscles. It also helps maintain healthy hair, bones, skin, and blood. Due to its High Biological Value (HBV), the protein obtained from meat is easily digested and thus absorbed quickly and effectively by the body. Meat is a good source of protein, vitamins, and minerals in your diet. Making healthier choices can help you eat meat as part of a healthy and balanced diet. But some meats are high in saturated fat, which can raise blood cholesterol levels.

Meat and Fish
Meat and Fish
Meat and Fish
Meat and Fish

Pork

Pork is one of the most popular forms of meat in the world. Despite some confusion on the issue, pork is classed as red meat. This is because it contains a large amount of hemoglobin, a protein responsible for the red color of meat. In fact, there are so many different cuts of pork, and a variety of meat products such as Bacon, Ham, Hot dogs, Jamun, Prosciutto, Salami, and Sausages use it.

Nutrition Facts

Here is the typical nutritional profile for ground pork meat per 100g.

Benefits

Pork is a particularly significant source of thiamine (vitamin B1). The content of this important vitamin is much higher than that in other types of meat, and it plays an essential role in glucose metabolism and protecting cardiac health. Much cheaper than most other meats, pork contains decent amounts of selenium and zinc, which are responsible for boosting the immune system, defending against oxidation stress, and optimal hormone production.

Concerns

Compared to other meats, pork contains extremely high levels of omega-6 fatty acids. Despite being essential for health, an unbalanced ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 can be pro-inflammatory in nature. Pork is more susceptible to bacterial contamination and food-borne illnesses than other types of meat. Then, it is necessary to make sure that pork is thoroughly cooked.

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Beef

When most people think of red meat, they probably imagine beef. There are many different beef products and cuts of beef, ranging from hamburgers to rib eye steaks. While mainstream health advice often dictates selecting the leanest cuts of red meat, fatty cuts of beef are perfectly healthy.

Benefits

Despite fearmongering over the fat content of beef, the main fatty acid in beef is none other than oleic acid. If you have not heard of it before, then it is the main fat in olive oil (and considered as “heart-healthy”). Beef contains a wide variety of beneficial compounds that include creatine, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), and glutathione.

Concerns

Excessive beef consumption can increase circulating iron to unhealthy levels in some individuals. These high levels can increase the risk of various cancers and cardiovascular disease. This risk is especially for those with a genetic mutation called hemochromatosis, which causes over-absorption of heme iron. Overcooking beef (burning) can lead to the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heterocyclic amines (HCAs). Both of these compounds are carcinogens, but we can minimize their risks by sensibly cooking meat.

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Lamb and Mutton

Both lamb and mutton are very similar types of meat, with one fundamental difference; Lamb is meat from a sheep less than one-year-old. Mutton is the meat of an adult sheep just like beef and pork. There are a variety of popular lamb cuts —perhaps lamb chops are the most popular.

Benefits

Generally speaking, both lamb and mutton are very healthy. Since sheep graze on pasture all day, the omega 6 to 3 ratio is very low—and optimal—compared to other types of meat. Lamb contains a broad range of health-protective nutrients especially zinc, selenium, and B vitamins.

Concerns

Compared to different types of meat, lamb is very expensive.

Meat and Fish

Chicken

Alongside beef and pork, chicken is one of the ‘big three’ popularity-wise. However, chicken is a different classification of meat and comes under the poultry category. People commonly refer to as ‘white meat’ rather than red. As one of the most popular foods in the world, there are all sorts of chicken-based foods. These range from fried and roasted chicken to chicken soup and even chicken popcorn. For health purposes, it is better to avoid the more processed of these options.

Benefits

Chicken is very cheap and easily affordable. For those who are trying to consume less fat/calories, chicken offers a smaller amount than other meats, but with the same protein content. Chicken stock/broth offers a significant source of gelatin. As chicken bones have a lower density than other meats, the collagen and gelatin are far easier to extract. Chicken provides a decent source of necessary vitamins and minerals, particularly selenium, potassium, phosphorus, and B vitamins.

Concerns

Due to commercial chicken feed—and similar to pork—chicken contains an excessive amount of omega-6. Whether this is problematic or not likely depends on the overall diet. Bacterial contamination with strains such as E. coli and salmonella is too common in chicken. As a result, strict hygiene procedures are necessary when handling the raw meat.

Meat and FishMeat and Fish
Pork
NutrientAmount
Calories263 Kcals
Carbohydrate0 g
Protein16.9 g
Fat21 g
   – Saturated7.9 g
   – Monounsaturated9.4 g
   – Polyunsaturated1.9 g
        – Omega-370 mg
        – Omega-61670 mg
Omega 6 to 3 Ratio23.8 : 1
Vitamin A0
Vitamin C1% RDI
Vitamin D
Vitamin E
Vitamin K
Thiamin49% RDI
Riboflavin14% RDI
Niacin22% RDI
Vitamin B619% RDI
Folate1% RDI
Vitamin B1212% RDI
Pantothenic Acid7% RDI
Calcium1% RDI
Iron5% RDI
Magnesium5% RDI
Phosphorus18% RDI
Potassium8% RDI
Sodium2% RDI
Zinc15% RDI
Copper2% RDI
Manganese1% RDI
Selenium35% RDI

Beaf
NutrientAmount
Calories254 Kcals
Carbohydrate0 g
Protein17.2 g
Fat20 g
   – Saturated7.7 g
   – Monounsaturated8.8 g
   – Polyunsaturated0.5 g
        – Omega-348 mg
        – Omega-6435 mg
Omega 6 to 3 Ratio9 : 1
Vitamin A0% RDI
Vitamin C0% RDI
Vitamin D
Vitamin E2%
Vitamin K2%
Thiamin3% RDI
Riboflavin9% RDI
Niacin21% RDI
Vitamin B616% RDI
Folate2% RDI
Vitamin B1236% RDI
Pantothenic Acid5% RDI
Calcium2% RDI
Iron11% RDI
Magnesium4% RDI
Phosphorus16% RDI
Potassium8% RDI
Sodium3% RDI
Zinc28% RDI
Copper3% RDI
Manganese1% RDI
Selenium21% RDI

Lamb and Mutton
NutrientAmount
Calories282 Kcals
Carbohydrate0 g
Protein16.6 g
Fat23.4 g
   – Saturated10.2 g
   – Monounsaturated9.6 g
   – Polyunsaturated1.9 g
        – Omega-3420 mg
        – Omega-61360 mg
Omega 6 to 3 Ratio3.2 : 1
Vitamin A0% RDI
Vitamin C0% RDI
Vitamin D
Vitamin E1% RDI
Vitamin K4% RDI
Thiamin7% RDI
Riboflavin12% RDI
Niacin30% RDI
Vitamin B66% RDI
Folate5% RDI
Vitamin B1239% RDI
Pantothenic Acid7% RDI
Calcium2% RDI
Iron9% RDI
Magnesium5% RDI
Phosphorus16% RDI
Potassium6% RDI
Sodium2% RDI
Zinc23% RDI
Copper5% RDI
Manganese1% RDI
Selenium27% RDI

Chicken
NutrientAmount
Calories143 Kcals
Carbohydrate0 g
Protein17.4 g
Fat8.1 g
   – Saturated2.3 g
   – Monounsaturated3.6 g
   – Polyunsaturated1.5 g
        – Omega-396 mg
        – Omega-61327 mg
Omega 6 to 3 Ratio13.8 : 1
Vitamin A0% RDI
Vitamin C0% RDI
Vitamin D
Vitamin E1% RDI
Vitamin K1% RDI
Thiamin7% RDI
Riboflavin14% RDI
Niacin22% RDI
Vitamin B619% RDI
Folate1% RDI
Vitamin B1214% RDI
Pantothenic Acid11% RDI
Calcium1% RDI
Iron5% RDI
Magnesium5% RDI
Phosphorus18% RDI
Potassium15% RDI
Sodium3% RDI
Zinc10% RDI
Copper3% RDI
Manganese1% RDI
Selenium15% RD

Statistics

Total Meat Production By region

 Global meat production has increased rapidly over the past 50 years – as seen below, total production has grown 4-5-fold since 1961. The chart below shows global meat production by region, measured in tones.

Regionally, Asia is the largest meat producer, accounting for around 40-45 percent of total meat production. This regional distribution has changed significantly in recent decades. In 1961, Europe and North America were the dominant meat producers, accounting for 42 and 25 percent, respectively. In 1961, Asia produced only 12 percent. By 2013, Europe and North America’s share had fallen to 19 and 15 percent, respectively. This reduction in production share was despite a large increase in production in absolute terms: Europe’s meat output has approximately doubled over this period, whilst North American output has increased 2.5-fold. Production increases in Asia; however, have been staggering: meat production has increased 15-fold since 1961. Absolute increases in production in other regions have also been substantial, with output in all regions (with exception to the Caribbean which approximately tripled) growing more than 5-fold over this period.

 

Total per capita meat consumption

The global population has undergone rapid growth, especially in the second half of the 20th century; we may therefore also expect the rapid growth in total meat production as explored in the sections above. But how has meat consumption changed on a per capita basis?

In the chart below, we see a global map of per capita meat (excluding seafood and fish) consumption, measured in kilograms per person per year. These trends can also be viewed as a time-series in the “chart” tab. As a global average, per capita meat consumption has increased approximately 20 kilograms since 1961; the average person consumed around 43 kilograms of meat in 2014. This increase in per capita meat trends means total meat production has been growing at a much faster rate than that of population growth. The direction and rate of change across countries has been highly variable. Growth in per capita meat consumption has been most marked in countries that have undergone a strong economic transition – per capita consumption in China has grown approximately 15-fold since 1961; rates in Brazil have nearly quadrupled. The major exception to this pattern has been India: dominant lactovegetarian preferences mean per capita meat consumption in 2013 was almost exactly the same as in 1961 at less than 4 kilograms per person.

Meat consumption is the highest across high-income countries (with the largest meat-eaters in Australia, consuming around 116 kilograms per person in 2013). The average Europeans and North Americans consume nearly 80 kilograms and more than 110 kilograms, respectively. However, changes in consumption in high-income countries have been much slower – with most stagnating or even decreasing over the last 50 years. Consumption trends across Africa are varied; some countries consume as low as 10 kilograms per person, around half of the continental average. Higher-income nations such as South Africa consume between 60-70 kilograms per person.

 

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